Birth Control Snapshot

Implant – Nexplanon

  • A matchstick-sized rod which is inserted , just under the skin, inside the arm to avoid pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and convenient
  • Must be inserted by a health care provider
  • Costs between $400 and $800 in advance, but can last about three years

The birth control implant is extremely effective. Less than one out of 100 women annually can become pregnant while using the implant. It lasts roughly three years.

Certain medicines and supplements might make the birth control implant less effective. Some examples are

  • certain TB medicines
  • certain medicines that are taken orally for yeast infections
  • certain HIV medicines
  • certain anti-seizure medicines
  • certain mental disorder medicines
  • herbals like St. John’s wort

Remember Implanon doesn’t prevent sexually transmitted diseases. Use a latex or female condom to lessen the chance of infection.

Birth Control Patch

  • A small patch that sticks to your skin to prevent pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and convenient
  • Easy to get with a prescription
  • Costs about $15–$80 a month

The birth control patch is extremely effective. It works best when it is always placed on the skin on time. That keeps the right level of hormone in a woman’s body.

  • Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use the birth control patch as directed.
  • About 9 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they don’t always use the birth control patch as directed.

The patch may be less effective for women that weigh over 198 pounds. But it could still be a good option for women of any size. Talk with your health care provider if you are concerned about how well the birth control patch may work for you.

Certain medicines and supplements may make the birth control patch not as effective. Some examples are

  • the antibiotic rifampin — other antibiotics do not make the patch less effective
  • the antifungal griseofulvin — other antifungals do not make the pill less effective
  • certain HIV medicines
  • certain anti-seizure medicines
  • St. John’s wort

Birth Control Pills

  • Take a pill each day to prevent pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and convenient
  • Easy to get with a prescription
  • Cost about $15–$50 each month

Birth control pills are very effective. Birth Control pills are the most effective when taken daily. Progestin-only pills must be taken at the same time every day. That keeps the right level of hormone in a woman’s body.

  • Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always take the pill each day as directed.
  • About 9 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they don’t always take the pill each day as directed.

The pill can be slightly less effective for women that are very overweight. Talk with your health care provider if you are concerned with how well the pill may work for you personally.

Certain medicines and supplements may make the pill less effective. Some examples are

  • the antibiotic rifampin — other antibiotics do not make the pill less effective
  • the antifungal griseofulvin — other antifungals do not make the pill less effective
  • certain HIV medicines
  • certain anti-seizure medicines
  • St. John’s wort

Vomiting and diarrhea can also prevent the pill from working. Ask your health care provider for advice. Have a backup method of birth control available- like a condom, female condom, diaphragm, sponge, or emergency contraception (morning after pill) – until you know you don’t need to.

Birth Control Shot (Depo-Provera)

  • A shot in the arm that prevents pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and convenient
  • Easy to get with a prescription
  • Lasts for three months
  • Costs $35–$100 per injection, plus any exam fees

The birth control shot is one of the most effective methods of birth control available. It works best when you get the birth control shot regularly, every 12 weeks.

  • Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use the birth control shot as directed.
  • About 6 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they don’t always use the birth control shot as directed.

Keep in mind the birth control shot doesn’t protect against sexually transmitted infections. Use a latex or female condom to reduce the risk of infection.

If you get the birth control shot within the first seven days after the start of your period, you are protected from pregnancy immediately. If you get the shot within five days after miscarriage or an abortion, or within three weeks after giving birth, you are protected from pregnancy immediately. Otherwise, you need to use some form of backup birth control — like a condom, female condom, diaphragm, sponge, or emergency contraception (morning after pill) — for the first week after getting the shot.

Each shot of Depo-Provera will protect you from pregnancy for 12 weeks. So you will need to go to your health care provider every 12 weeks for a shot. If you are two or more weeks late getting your shot, your health care provider may ask you to take a pregnancy test, or may advise you to use emergency contraception if you had vaginal intercourse in the previous 120 hours (five days).

Birth Control Vaginal Ring (NuvaRing)

  • A small ring you put in your vagina once a month for three weeks to prevent pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and convenient
  • Easy to get with a prescription
  • Costs about $15–$80 a month

The vaginal ring is a very effective method. It works best when a woman inserts it, keeps it in place for three weeks, takes it out for one week, and then inserts a new ring. That keeps the correct level of hormone in a woman’s body.

  • Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they always use NuvaRing as directed.
  • About 9 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they don’t always use NuvaRing as directed.

Certain medicines and supplements may make NuvaRing less effective. Some examples are

  • the antibiotic rifampin — other antibiotics do not make the ring less effective
  • the antifungal griseofulvin — other antifungals do not make the pill less effective
  • certain HIV medicines
  • certain anti-seizure medicines
  • St. John’s wort

Condom

    • Worn on the penis
    • Made of latex or plastic
    • Prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection
    • Can be used with another form of birth control for extra protection
    • Can be used for vaginal, anal, or oral sex
    • Safe, effective, and easy to get
    • Cost about $1 each

Like all birth control methods, condoms are more effective when you use them correctly.

  • Each year, 2 out of 100 women whose partners use condoms will become pregnant if they always use condoms correctly.
  • Each year, 18 out of 100 women whose partners use condoms will become pregnant if they don’t always use condoms correctly.

You can make condoms more effective if you

  • use spermicide with them
  • pull out before ejaculation.

Using Spermicide

The most commonly used spermicide in the U.S. is called nonoxynol-9. Nonoxynol-9 has certain risks. If it is used many times a day, if it is used by people at risk for HIV, or if it is used for anal sex, it may irritate tissue and increase the risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

Effectiveness is also a concern when it comes to safer sex. Condoms also protect both you and your partner from . Condoms that are made of latex offer very good protection againstsexually transmitted infections HIV. Latex condoms also reduce the risk of other sexually transmitted infections, including

  • chlamydia
  • chancroid
  • gonorrhea
  • hepatitis B
  • herpes
  • HPV
  • pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • syphilis
  • trichomniasis

 

Diaphragm

  • A shallow silicone cup inserted into the vagina to prevent pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and convenient
  • Lasts up to two years
  • Costs about $15–$75

Like all birth control methods, the diaphragm is more effective when you use it correctly.

  • If women always use the diaphragm as directed, 6 out of 100 will become pregnant each year.
  • If women don’t always use the diaphragm as directed, 12 out of 100 will become pregnant each year.

You can make the diaphragm more effective if you

  • Make sure it covers your cervix before each time you have intercourse.
  • Make sure spermicide is used as recommended.

Your partner can help you make the diaphragm more effective by using a latex condom or pulling out before ejaculation

IUD

  • Small, “T-shaped” device inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy
  • Safe, effective, and long lasting
  • Must be inserted by a health care provider
  • Costs between $500 and $1,000 up front, but lasts up to 10 years

Thre ar ecurrently 2 IUD’s available; Mirena and Paragard IUD.

IUDs are one of the most effective forms of birth control available. Less than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year if they use an IUD.

Keep in mind that the IUD doesn’t protect against sexually transmitted infections. Use a condom along with the IUD to reduce the risk of infection.

Spermicide

  • substance that prevents pregnancy by stopping sperm from moving
  • Safe and convenient
  • Easy to use
  • Costs about $8 per package

 

Like all birth control methods, spermicide is more effective when you use it correctly.

  • If women always use spermicide as directed, 15 out of 100 will become pregnant each year.
  • If women don’t always use spermicide as directed, 29 out of 100 will become pregnant each year.

When used alone, spermicide is not very effective. You can make it more effective if you also use a condom.

Your partner can help you make spermicide more effective by using a latex condom or pulling out before ejaculation.

But even if you don’t use another method along with spermicide, your chance of getting pregnant is much less than if you use no birth control at all.

Morning-After Pill (Emergency Contraception)

  • Birth control you can use to prevent pregnancy up to five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex
  • Two kinds of emergency contraception — morning-after pill and ParaGard IUD insertion
  • Safe and effective
  • Available at health centers and drugstores
  • Costs vary from $30 to $65 for the morning-after pill and $500 to $900 for IUD insertion

Levonogestrel pills, including the brands Plan B One-Step and Next Choice One Dose, are up to 89 percent effective when taken within 72 hours (three days) after unprotected sex. They continue to reduce the risk of pregnancy up to 120 hours (five days) after unprotected sex, but they are less effective as time passes.

The morning-after pill will not prevent pregnancy for any unprotected sex you may have after taking the pills.

However, the ParaGard IUD can be used as highly effective, ongoing birth control for as long as you want, up to 10 years after insertion.

Levonogestrel pills may not work as well for women who have a body mass index (BMI) of more than 25. The IUD is a better option for overweight women who need emergency contraception.

Sterilization for Women (Tubal Sterilization)

  • Surgery that prevents pregnancy
  • Safe and highly effective
  • Costs between $1,500 and $6,000
  • Meant to be permanent

Sterilization is nearly 100 percent effective.

  • For every 1,000 women who have Essure, fewer than 3 will become pregnant.
  • For every 1,000 women who have traditional incision methods, about 5 will become pregnant.

Most kinds of sterilization for women are effective right away. But it takes about three months before Essure is effective.

Vasectomy

  • Sterilization for men that prevents pregnancy
  • Safe and effective
  • Costs $350 to $1,000
  • Meant to be permanent

Vasectomy is the most effective birth control for men. It is nearly 100 percent effective.

However, vasectomy is not immediately effective. Sperm remains beyond the blocked tubes. You must use other birth control until the sperm are used up. It usually takes about three months. A simple test — semen analysis — shows when there are no more sperm in your ejaculate.

For those who have questions or perhaps wish to make a scheduled appointment, please contact us at 928-733-6291.